Timeline of An Audition

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Jen Levin.jpgWednesday:

3:40pm-Working at day job. Trying to focus on work and not thinking about how much you would rather be acting (or doing anything else besides working at your day job).

3:41pm-Hear the text message notification vibration coming from your phone. Wonder if it could possibly be from your agents.

3:42pm-Check phone under desk so nobody else sees and realize it is a text from your agents! Silently celebrate while you read the message.

3:43pm-See that the audition is for tomorrow when you are supposed to be working. Prepare nerves to ask for the time off. Confirm with your agents that you will be at the audition (even if you don’t get the time off).

3:50pm-Ask boss to come in late tomorrow so you can attend an audition. He says yes, you again silently celebrate.

8:30pm-Finally get off of work. Look at breakdown and see that you have to download some sides as soon as you get home.

9:00pm-Print out sides, memorize lines, figure out where audition is, print out resume to attach to headshot.

11:50pm-Finally go to bed. Can’t sleep because you are too excited/nervous. Dream about how this job could totally change your life (even though you know it really wouldn’t).

Thursday

7:00am-Wake up, do morning routines, plan outfit.

8:00am-Make sure everything you prepared the night before is still there. Try to relax before leaving.

10:00am-After putting together an outfit (you are auditioning for a trailer park lady), discover that hidden in the sides it mentions that the character you are auditioning for is wearing a pink nightgown.

10:01am-Dig though clothes, realize you own a pink nightgown (with black polka dots) and put that on instead.

10:30am-Leave house wearing the nightgown with some yoga pants underneath for modesty. Run back inside the house to take a webcam photo so you can include it in your blog post.

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10:30-11:30am-Drive from westside to audition in the valley. Park where the casting director said to park on the audition notice.

11:30am-Take some deep breaths in the car and wait until it is a little closer to your audition time to go inside.

11:35am-Now it is 10 minutes from the audition time, so you head inside the casting office.

11:36am-Realize that you are the youngest (by 15 years) and thinnest (by probably 50 pounds) in the room. Sometimes it isn’t best to be the youngest/thinnest.

11:37am-Get called into audition room.

11:38am-Audition.

11:39am-Leaving casting office. Wonder if you could have done it better/funnier/trailer parkier.

11:40am-Drive back to the westside to go to day job late. Try to forget that you had an audition and move on with your life.

Sunday 

6pm-Write up blog post recapping the experience. Haven’t heard anything yet, but it doesn’t shoot for a few days so there is still a chance to get a “Woo Hoo!!” text message from your agents.

About Jen Levin

Actress/Blogger - I’m originally from the Bay Area, but I’ve been in LA for over a decade now, so I consider myself a native. I’m working as both a blogger and actress (with a couple of day jobs to pay the bills on the side). I love being in the entertainment industry where every day is an adventure! When I’m not working on my career, I’m either reading (I’m a total book nerd) or enjoying my newfound love for spin class (which is helping towards my goal of losing 100 pounds for the last time). I like to joke that I’m a girl with Southern charm and Jersey moxie, which I think has worked well for me so far!

  • Your opening paragraph made me smile: Working at day job. Trying to focus on work and not thinking about how much you would rather be acting (or doing anything else besides working at your day job)

    How many boring day jobs are there, where artists from all disciplines suffer day in and day out? Frequently we have more than one degree too.

    Did you get the gig?

    • Jen

      Sadly, I did not get the gig. But I think I impressed the casting office (which is more important to me than booking every job).

      • Too bad!

        Out of curiosity:
        I live in Sweden, the system for acting auditions here is different. Is it necessary for you to have an agent or can you do it alone?

        • Jen

          There are some jobs that you can find without an agent, but for most film/tv roles, the breakdowns are only released to agents.

          Most of the time, things that you can submit yourself for are non-union, student films, or non-paying jobs.

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